Përkthime

Diskutime tek 'Letërsia' filluar nga Diabolis Dassaretis, 12 Nov 2002.

  1. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    Lesbia është emri i gruas së një bashkëkohësi të Catullusit. Pra Catullusi i ka shkruar vargjet për një femër reale, dhe dashnori kodosh ka qënë dora vetë.
     
  2. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    Milion latinisht eshte decies centena milia
    hapa nje fjalor dhe perseri nuk gjej fjalet feceresium dhe ate poshte saj e ndonje tjeter.
    Megjithate gjeta dien = deinde qe do ta perdor pastaj, dhe usque qe me duket se eshte fjale kuc qe ka kuptimin vazhdimisht.
    Pra nje rresht do jete:
    Dhe pastaj vazhdimisht njemije, dhe pas saj njeqind.
     
  3. Diavolessa

    Diavolessa Valoris scriptorum

    Re: Përkthime

    Cdo gjuhe e huaj ka rimat e saj /pf/images/graemlins/wink.gif Kete e dime. Shume fjale vec e vec kane nje kuptim, kurse duke vijuar pas nje fjale tjeter mund te marre kuptim tjeter.

    pS: Nuk ishte kritike ajo qe bera. Thjeshte mendim i ndryshem nga i yti. Per mua ka ate kuptim qe thashe me lart /pf/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Te dhuroj nje pjese e vogel nga Sonet

    In faith I do not love thee with mine eyes.
    For they in thee a thousand errors note.
    But'tis my heart that loves what they despise.
    Who in desipte od view is pleased t dote.

    pS: Anglisht s'di ndaj zgjedh pjese kaq te shkurtera /pf/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  4. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    Lesbia

    Jetojmë Lesbia ime, të dashuruar,
    Thashethemet vrastare të pleqve
    Vlejnë sa një kacidhe e shpuar!
    Ditët shkojnë dhe vijnë sërisht:
    Kur të epet dritashkurta që na ndrit
    Të biem në krahët e një natë pambarim.
    Më jep njëmijë puthje, pastaj dhe njëqind,
    Më pas njëmijë të tjera, më pas të dytën qind,
    Pastaj vazhdimisht njëmijë, pastaj dhe njëqind.
    Pastaj kur mijrat kështu të shumohen,
    I bashkojmë të gjitha, le të harrohen,
    E asnjë smirëzi i tillë të mos guxojë
    Kaq shumë puthje të mendojë.
     
  5. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    OLIVER GOLDSMITH

    The deserted village

    Sweet Auburn! loveliest village of the plain,
    Where health and plenty cheered the labouring swain,
    Where smiling spring its earliest visits paid,
    And parting summer's lingering blooms delayed:
    Dear lovely bowers of innocence and ease,
    Seats of my youth, where every sport could please,
    How often have I loitered o'er your green,
    Where humble happiness endeared each scene;
    How often have I paused on every charm,
    The sheltered cot, the cultivated farm,
    The never-failing brook, the busy mill,
    The decent church that topped the neighbouring hill,
    The hawthorn bush, with seats beneath the shade,
    For talking age and whispering lovers made;
    How often have I blessed the coming day,
    When toil remitting lent its turn to play,
    And all the village train, from labour free,
    Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree:
    While many a pastime circled in the shade,
    The young contending as the old surveyed;
    And many a gambol frolicked o'er the ground,
    And sleights of art and feats of strength went round;
    And still as each repeated pleasure tired,
    Succeeding sports the mirthful band inspired;
    The dancing pair that simply sought renown
    By holding out to tire each other down!
    The swain mistrustless of his smutted face,
    While secret laughter tittered round the place;
    The bashful virgin's sidelong look of love,
    The matron's glance that would those looks reprove:
    These were thy charms, sweet village; sports like these,
    With sweet succession, taught even toil to please;
    These round thy bowers their cheerful influence shed,
    These were thy charms -But all these charms are fled.
    Sweet smiling village, loveliest of the lawn,
    Thy sports are fled, and all thy charms withdrawn;
    Amidst thy bowers the tyrant's hand is seen,
    And desolation saddens all thy green:
    One only master grasps the whole domain,
    And half a tillage stints thy smiling plain:
    No more thy glassy brook reflects the day,
    But choked with sedges works its weedy way.
    Along thy glades, a solitary guest,
    The hollow-sounding bittern guards its nest;
    Amidst thy desert walks the lapwing flies,
    And tires their echoes with unvaried cries.
    Sunk are thy bowers, in shapeless ruin all,
    And the long grass o'ertops the mouldering wall;
    And, trembling, shrinking from the spoiler's hand,
    Far, far away, thy children leave the land.
    Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey,
    Where wealth accumulates, and men decay:
    Princes and lords may flourish, or may fade;
    A breath can make them, as a breath has made;
    But a bold peasantry, their country's pride,
    When once destroyed can never be supplied.
    A time there was, ere England's griefs began,
    When every rood of ground maintained its man;
    For him light labour spread her wholesome store,
    Just gave what life required, but gave no more:
    His best companions, innocence and health;
    And his best riches, ignorance of wealth.
    But times are altered; trade's unfeeling train
    Usurp the land and dispossess the swain;
    Along the lawn, where scattered hamlet's rose,
    Unwieldy wealth and cumbrous pomp repose,
    And every want to opulence allied,
    And every pang that folly pays to pride.
    Those gentle hours that plenty bade to bloom,
    Those calm desires that asked but little room,
    Those healthful sports that graced the peaceful scene,
    Lived in each look, and brightened all the green;
    These, far departing, seek a kinder shore,
    And rural mirth and manners are no more.
    Sweet Auburn! parent of the blissful hour,
    Thy glades forlorn confess the tyrant's power.
    Here as I take my solitary rounds,
    Amidst thy tangling walks and ruined grounds,
    And, many a year elapsed, return to view
    Where once the cottage stood, the hawthorn grew,
    Remembrance wakes with all her busy train,
    Swells at my breast, and turns the past to pain.
    In all my wanderings round this world of care,
    In all my griefs -and God has given my share -
    I still had hopes my latest hours to crown,
    Amidst these humble bowers to lay me down;
    To husband out life's taper at the close,
    And keep the flame from wasting by repose.
    I still had hopes, for pride attends us still,
    Amidst the swains to show my book-learned skill,
    Around my fire an evening group to draw,
    And tell of all I felt and all I saw;
    And, as a hare, whom hounds and horns pursue,
    Pants to the place from whence at first she flew,
    I still had hopes, my long vexations passed,
    Here to return -and die at home at last.
    O blest retirement, friend to life's decline,
    Retreats from care, that never must be mine,
    How happy he who crowns in shades like these
    A youth of labour with an age of ease;
    Who quits a world where strong temptations try,
    And, since 'tis hard to combat, learns to fly!
    For him no wretches, born to work and weep,
    Explore the mine, or tempt the dangerous deep;
    No surly porter stands in guilty state
    To spurn imploring famine from the gate;
    But on he moves to meet his latter end,
    Angels round befriending Virtue's friend;
    Bends to the grave with unperceived decay,
    While Resignation gently slopes the way;
    All, all his prospects brightening to the last,
    His Heaven commences ere the world be past!
    Sweet was the sound when oft at evening's close
    Up yonder hill the village murmur rose;
    There, as I passed with careless steps and slow,
    The mingling notes came softened from below;
    The swain responsive as the milkmaid sung,
    The sober herd that lowed to meet their young;
    The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool,
    The playful children just let loose from school;
    The watchdog's voice that bayed the whisp'ring wind,
    And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind;
    These all in sweet confusion sought the shade,
    And filled each pause the nightingale had made.
    But now the sounds of population fail,
    No cheerful murmurs fluctuate in the gale,
    No busy steps the grass-grown footway tread,
    For all the bloomy flush of life is fled.
    All but yon widowed, solitary thing,
    That feebly bends beside the plashy spring;
    She, wretched matron, forced in age for bread
    To strip the brook with mantling cresses spread,
    To pick her wintry faggot from the thorn,
    To seek her nightly shed, and weep till morn;
    She only left of all the harmless train,
    The sad historian of the pensive plain.
    Near yonder copse, where once the garden smiled,
    And still where many a garden flower grows wild;
    There, where a few torn shrubs the place disclose,
    The village preacher's modest mansion rose.
    A man he was to all the country dear,
    And passing rich with forty pounds a year;
    Remote from towns he ran his godly race,
    Nor e'er had changed, nor wished to change, his place;
    Unpractised he to fawn, or seek for power,
    By doctrines fashioned to the varying hour;
    Far other aims his heart had learned to prize,
    More skilled to raise the wretched than to rise.
    His house was known to all the vagrant train,
    He chid their wanderings, but relieved their pain;
    The long remembered beggar was his guest,
    Whose beard descending swept his aged breast;
    The ruined spendthrift, now no longer proud,
    Claimed kindred there, and had his claims allowed;
    The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay,
    Sat by his fire, and talked the night away;
    Wept o'er his wounds, or, tales of sorrow done,
    Shouldered his crutch, and showed how fields were won.
    Pleased with his guests, the good man learned to glow,
    And quite forgot their vices in their woe;
    Careless their merits or their faults to scan,
    His pity gave ere charity began.
    Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride,
    And e'en his failings leaned to Virtue's side;
    But in his duty prompt at every call,
    He watched and wept, he prayed and felt, for all.
    And, as a bird each fond endearment tries
    To tempt its new-fledged offspring to the skies,
    He tried each art, reproved each dull delay,
    Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way.
    Beside the bed where parting life was laid,
    And sorrow, guilt, and pain, by turns dismayed,
    The reverend champion stood. At his control
    Despair and anguish fled the struggling soul;
    Comfort came down the trembling wretch to raise,
    And his last faltering accents whispered praise.
    At church, with meek and unaffected grace,
    His looks adorned the venerable place;
    Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway,
    And fools, who came to scoff, remained to pray.
    The service passed, around the pious man,
    With steady zeal, each honest rustic ran;
    Even children followed with endearing wile,
    And plucked his gown, to share the good man's smile.
    His ready smile a parent's warmth expressed,
    Their welfare pleased him, and their cares distressed;
    To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given,
    But all his serious thoughts had rest in Heaven.
    As some tall cliff, that lifts its awful form,
    Swells from the vale, and midway leaves the storm,
    Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread,
    Eternal sunshine settles on its head.
    Beside yon straggling fence that skirts the way,
    With blossomed furze unprofitably gay,
    There, in his noisy mansion, skilled to rule,
    The village master taught his little school;
    A man severe he was, and stern to view;
    I knew him well, and every truant knew;
    Well had the boding tremblers learned to trace
    The day's disasters in his morning face;
    Full well they laughed, with counterfeited glee,
    At all his jokes, for many a joke had he;
    Full well the busy whisper, circling round,
    Conveyed the dismal tidings when he frowned;
    Yet he was kind; or if severe in aught,
    The love he bore to learning was in fault.
    The village all declared how much he knew;
    'Twas certain he could write, and cipher too;
    Lands he could measure, terms and tides presage,
    And even the story ran that he could gauge.
    In arguing too, the parson owned his skill,
    For e'en though vanquished, he could argue still;
    While words of learned length and thundering sound
    Amazed the gazing rustics ranged around,
    And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew
    That one small head could carry all he knew.
    But past is all his fame. The very spot
    Where many a time he triumphed is forgot.
    Near yonder thorn, that lifts its head on high,
    Where once the signpost caught the passing eye,
    Low lies that house where nut-brown draughts inspired,
    Where grey-beard mirth and smiling toil retired,
    Where village statesmen talked with looks profound,
    And news much older than their ale went round.
    Imagination fondly stoops to trace
    The parlour splendours of that festive place:
    The white-washed wall, the nicely sanded floor,
    The varnished clock that clicked behind the door;
    The chest contrived a double debt to pay, -
    A bed by night, a chest of drawers by day;
    The pictures placed for ornament and use,
    The twelve good rules, the royal game of goose;
    The hearth, except when winter chilled the day,
    With aspen boughs, and flowers, and fennel gay;
    While broken teacups, wisely kept for show,
    Ranged o'er the chimney, glistened in a row.
    Vain transitory splendours! Could not all
    Reprieve the tottering mansion from its fall!
    Obscure it sinks, nor shall it more impart
    An hour's importance to the poor man's heart;
    Thither no more the peasant shall repair
    To sweet oblivion of his daily care;
    No more the farmer's news, the barber's tale,
    No more the woodman's ballad shall prevail;
    No more the smith his dusky brow shall clear,
    Relax his ponderous strength, and lean to hear;
    The host himself no longer shall be found
    Careful to see the mantling bliss go round;
    Nor the coy maid, half willing to be pressed,
    Shall kiss the cup to pass it to the rest.
    Yes! let the rich deride, the proud disdain,
    These simple blessings of the lowly train;
    To me more dear, congenial to my heart,
    One native charm, than all the gloss of art.
    Spontaneous joys, where Nature has its play,
    The soul adopts, and owns their first-born sway;
    Lightly they frolic o'er the vacant mind,
    Unenvied, unmolested, unconfined:
    But the long pomp, the midnight masquerade,
    With all the freaks of wanton wealth arrayed,
    In these, ere triflers half their wish obtain,
    The toiling pleasure sickens into pain;
    And, even while fashion's brightest arts decoy,
    The heart distrusting asks, if this be joy.
    Ye friends to truth, ye statesmen, who survey
    The rich man's joys increase, the poor's decay,
    'Tis yours to judge how wide the limits stand
    Between a splendid and a happy land.
    Proud swells the tide with loads of freighted ore,
    And shouting Folly hails them from her shore;
    Hoards even beyond the miser's wish abound,
    And rich men flock from all the world around.
    Yet count our gains. This wealth is but a name
    That leaves our useful products still the same.
    Not so the loss. The man of wealth and pride
    Takes up a space that many poor supplied;
    Space for his lake, his park's extended bounds,
    Space for his horses, equipage, and hounds;
    The robe that wraps his limbs in silken sloth
    Has robbed the neighbouring fields of half their growth;
    His seat, where solitary sports are seen,
    Indignant spurns the cottage from the green;
    Around the world each needful product flies,
    For all the luxuries the world supplies:
    While thus the land adorned for pleasure, all
    In barren splendour feebly waits the fall.
    As some fair female unadorned and plain,
    Secure to please while youth confirms her reign,
    Slights every borrowed charm that dress supplies,
    Nor shares with art the triumph of her eyes;
    But when those charms are passed, for charms are frail,
    When time advances and when lovers fail,
    She then shines forth, solicitous to bless,
    In all the glaring impotence of dress.
    Thus fares the land, by luxury betrayed,
    In nature's simplest charms at first arrayed;
    But verging to decline, its splendours rise,
    Its vistas strike, its palaces surprise;
    While, scourged by famine, from the smiling land
    The mournful peasant leads his humble band;
    And while he sinks, without one arm to save,
    The country blooms -a garden, and a grave.
    Where then, ah! where, shall poverty reside,
    To 'scape the pressure of contiguous pride?
    If to some common's fenceless limits strayed,
    He drives his flock to pick the scanty blade,
    Those fenceless fields the sons of wealth divide,
    And even the bare-worn common is denied.
    If to the city sped -what waits him there?
    To see profusion that he must not share;
    To see ten thousand baneful arts combined
    To pamper luxury, and thin mankind;
    To see those joys the sons of pleasure know
    Extorted from his fellow creature's woe.
    Here, while the courtier glitters in brocade,
    There the pale artist plies the sickly trade;
    Here, while the proud their long-drawn pomps display,
    There the black gibbet glooms beside the way.
    The dome where Pleasure holds her midnight reign
    Here, richly decked, admits the gorgeous train;
    Tumultuous grandeur crowds the blazing square,
    The rattling chariots clash, the torches glare.
    Sure scenes like these no troubles e'er annoy!
    Sure these denote one universal joy!
    Are these thy serious thoughts? -Ah, turn thine eyes
    Where the poor houseless shivering female lies.
    She once, perhaps, in a village plenty blessed,
    Has wept at tales of innocence distressed;
    Her modest looks the cottage might adorn,
    Sweet as the primrose peeps beneath the thorn;
    Now lost to all; her friends, her virtue fled,
    Near her betrayer's door she lays her head,
    And, pinched with cold, and shrinking from the shower,
    With heavy heart deplores that luckless hour,
    When idly first, ambitious of the town,
    She left her wheel and robes of country brown.
    Do thine, sweet Auburn, thine, the loveliest train,
    Do thy fair tribes participate her pain?
    E'en now, perhaps, by cold and hunger led,
    At proud men's doors they ask a little bread!
    Ah, no! -To distant climes, a dreary scene,
    Where half the convex world intrudes between,
    Through torrid tracts with fainting steps they go,
    Where wild Altama murmurs to their woe.
    Far different there from all that charmed before,
    The various terrors of that horrid shore;
    Those blazing suns that dart a downward ray
    And fiercely shed intolerable day;
    Those matted woods where birds forget to sing,
    But silent bats in drowsy clusters cling;
    Those poisonous fields with rank luxuriance crowned,
    Where the dark scorpion gathers death around;
    Where at each step the stranger fears to wake
    The rattling terrors of the vengeful snake;
    Where crouching tigers wait their hapless prey,
    And savage men more murderous still than they;
    While oft in whirls the mad tornado flies,
    Mingling the ravaged landscape with the skies.
    Far different these from every former scene,
    The cooling brook, the grassy-vested green,
    The breezy covert of the warbling grove,
    That only sheltered thefts of harmless love.
    Good Heaven! what sorrows gloomed that parting day
    That called them from their native walks away;
    When the poor exiles, every pleasure passed,
    Hung round their bowers, and fondly looked their last,
    And took a long farewell, and wished in vain
    For seats like these beyond the western main;
    And, shuddering still to face the distant deep,
    Returned and wept, and still returned to weep.
    The good old sire, the first prepared to go
    To new-found worlds, and wept for others' woe;
    But for himself, in conscious virtue brave,
    He only wished for worlds beyond the grave.
    His lovely daughter, lovelier in her tears,
    The fond companion of his helpless years,
    Silent went next, neglectful of her charms,
    And left a lover's for a father's arms.
    With louder plaints the mother spoke her woes,
    And blessed the cot where every pleasure rose;
    And kissed her thoughtless babes with many a tear,
    And clasped them close, in sorrow doubly dear;
    Whilst her fond husband strove to lend relief
    In all the silent manliness of grief.
    O luxury! thou cursed by Heaven's decree,
    How ill exchanged are things like these for thee!
    How do thy potions, with insidious joy,
    Diffuse thy pleasures only to destroy!
    Kingdoms by thee, to sickly greatness grown,
    Boast of a florid vigour not their own;
    At every draught more large and large they grow,
    A bloated mass of rank unwieldly woe;
    Till, sapped their strength, and every part unsound,
    Down, down they sink, and spread the ruin round.
    Even now the devastation is begun,
    And half the business of destruction done;
    Even now, methinks, as pondering here I stand,
    I see the rural virtues leave the land:
    Down where yon anchoring vessel spreads the sail
    That idly waiting flaps with every gale,
    Downward they move, a melancholy band,
    Pass from the shore, and darken all the strand.
    Contented toil, and hospitable care,
    And kind connubial tenderness, are there;
    And piety with wishes placed above,
    And steady loyalty, and faithful love.
    And thou, sweet Poetry, thou loveliest maid,
    Still first to fly where sensual joys invade;
    Unfit in these degenerate times of shame
    To catch the heart, or strike for honest fame;
    Dear charming nymph, neglected and decried,
    My shame in crowds, my solitary pride;
    Thou source of all my bliss, and all my woe,
    That found'st me poor at first, and keep'st me so;
    Thou guide by which the nobler arts excel,
    Thou nurse of every virtue, fare thee well!
    Farewell, and oh! where'er thy voice be tried,
    On Torno's cliffs, or Pambamarca's side,
    Whether where equinoctial fervours glow,
    Or winter wraps the polar world in snow,
    Still let thy voice, prevailing over time,
    Redress the rigours of th' inclement clime;
    Aid slighted truth; with thy persuasive strain
    Teach erring man to spurn the rage of gain;
    Teach him that states of native strength possessed,
    Though very poor, may still be very blessed;
    That trade's proud empire hastes to swift decay,
    As ocean sweeps the laboured mole away;
    While self-dependent power can time defy,
    As rocks resist the billows and the sky
     
  6. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    Në këtë postim janë vetëm 100 vargjet e para të postimit anglisht si më sipër, ndonse më duhet të them se e kam përkthyer bazuar në libër e jo ndërrjet.
    Kanë qënë katër vargje në anglisht tek një shkrim i Gazetës Korrieri, ku autori një i huaj, i përdorte për të treguar se ato që shihte në një nga fshtrat e jugut të Shqipërisë, duhet ti kishte patur parasysh Oliver Goldsmithi vite e vite përpara kur kishte shkruar këtë poemë:


    OLIVER GOLDSMITH

    Fshati i shkretuar

    I ëmbli Gështenjas! fshati me i dashur në rafsh,
    Ku shëndeti dhe bollëku gëzojnë puntorin djalosh,
    Ku pranvera e qeshur vizitën e saj të shpejtë pagoi;
    Dhe mëdyshja e verës lulëzimin për më tej vonoi;
    Të dashurat tenda tërheqëse çiltërsie dhe qetësie,
    Vendthet e rinisë time, kur çdo lodër mirësevinte,
    Sa shpesh jam sjellë përmbi gjelbërimin tënd,
    Ku lumturi të përulta bëjnë zemër në çdo vend,
    Sa shpesh kam ndaluar në pamjet e magjepsura,
    Në kasollen me strehë, tokat e punuara,
    Në përroin e papushuar, mullirin punëzënë,
    Në kishën e hijshme që kulmon kodrën fqinjë,
    Kaçuben e murrizave me ndënjëse në hije,
    Për moshën e fjalëve dhe pëshpëritjet e dashnorëve!
    Sa shpesh unë bekova ditën që do pasojë
    Kur i dërrmuar jep hua prehjen për një lojë,
    Dhe gjithë fshati ushtron nga puna i liruar,
    Ngre lart lodrat e tij nën pemën e kurorëzuar;
    Ndërsa shumica kohën e lirë nën hije kalon,
    Të rinjtë ndeshen ndërsa pleqëria vrojton,
    Të shumtë një lodër gjallërojnë në atë log,
    Shpalosje arti dhe bëma force shkojnë tok!
    E ndërsa çdo kënaqsi e përsëritur të vel,
    Lodrave pas zazeve gazmore frymëzimi ju del;
    Çifti kërcimtar që aq thjesht kërkon famë,
    Të mbahet fort të rrëzojë tjetrin në tokë,
    Djaloshi pa pabesi me fytyrën blozë
    Qeshje të fshehta nën hundë hedh në rrëzë,
    Virgjeresha e ndruajtur sheh shkarazi me dashuri,
    Vejusha rrëshqanthi ti ketë shikimet si në rini.
    Këto ishin magjepsjet e tua, fshat i dashur! lodra si këto,
    Ëmbël me radhë, mësuar që dhe i dërmuari i do;
    Ndër rrathë hijet tënde ndikimin e tyre gëzimplotë përhapën;
    Këto ishin magjepsjet e tua - por të gjitha magjepsjet u zhdukën.
    I ëmbli fshat i qeshur, më i dashuri ndër lëndinat pa anë,
    Lodrat tënde u zhdukën, dhe gjithë magjepsjet t'u thanë;
    Në mes të hijeve tënde dora e tiranit është parë,
    Dhe shkretimi helmon gjithë gjelbërimin tënd:
    Vetëm një pronar rrok të gjithë zotërimin,
    Dhe një gjysëm lërim kufizon rafshinën tënde të qeshur.
    Jo më përroi yt i tejdukshëm pasqyron ditën,
    Por bllokuar prej barishteve hap gërdallshe rrugën;
    Përgjatë lëndianve të tua, një mik vetmon,
    Çafka zëzgavruar vezën e saj ngron;
    Mes ecjes tënde shkretane kralehti fluturon (lapwing - Vanellus),
    Dhe këput jehonat kur britmat ndryshon;
    Janë zhytur hijet tënde në rrënim të shformuar,
    Dhe bari i lartë ja kalon murrit të thërrmuar;
    Dhe, rrënqethur, tkurrur nga dora prishanike,
    Larg, shumë larg bijtë tënd lanë tokën në ikje.
    Keq ushqehet toka, dhe keq e nxit prenë,
    Ku pasuria grumbullohet dhe burrat janë shpërbërë;
    Princat dhe lordët mund të vringëllijnë, a perëndojnë-
    Një frymë i bën ata, si fryma është bërë vetë-
    Por një fshatarsi guximtare, krenarinë e vendit të vet,
    Veç njëherë shkatërruar, kurrë s'ka të zëvendësuar.
    Kohë tjetër atëhere, kur fatkeqsitë e Anglisë filluan,
    Kur prej çdo thurrje toke burrat e saj jetuan:
    Për të punë e lehtë ja mbushte zahire dhe bute,
    I jepte jeta ç'kërkonte, por më tepër nuk jepte;
    Shokët e tij më të mirë, çiltërsia dhe shëndeti,
    Pasuria e tij më e madhe, padija për begati.
    Por kohët janë ndryshuar; treni i tregut i pandjenja,
    Rrëmbeu tokën, dhe djaloshin la pa prona:
    Përgjatë lëndinave ku fshatthi ngrihej shpërndarë,
    Kaba të papërdorshme dhe lluksoze janë shtrirë,
    Dhe kushdo dëshiron ti bashkohet begatisë,
    Dhe çdo brerje me budallallëk i paguan krenarisë.
    Ato orë të këndshme që shumë ju ofruan lulëzim,
    Ato dëshira të fshehta që kërkojnë veç pak ajrim,
    Ato lodra të shëndetshme që hijeshuan skena paqtimi,
    Të gjalla në çdo pamje që shndritën atij gjelbërimi-
    Këto, larg mbaruar, kërkojnë një breg më për të qënë,
    Dhe gazi fshatarak dhe doket shkuan dhe vanë.
    I ëmbli Gështenjas! prind i orës gëzimplotë,
    Lirishtat e tua të braktisura fuqinë e tiranit provojnë.
    Këtu, teksa marr xhirot time vetmitare
    Mes rrugëve tënde mpleksur dhe truajve rrënë fare,
    Dhe, më shumë se një vit shkuar, kthyer në atë pamje
    Ku njëherë shtëpiza qëndronte, murrizi lartonte,
    Kujtimet zgjohen të gjithë karvan ngarkuar,
    Enjt gjoksin tim, dhe në dhimbje kthen kohën e shkuar.
    Në gjithë udhëtimet e mia rreth kësaj bote me shqetsime,
    Në gjithë fatkeqsitë e mia - ku Zoti pjesën më dha-
    Unë kisha shpresë, orët e fundit të kurorëzoja,
    Nën këto tenda të përkulura të prehem;
    Për kandilen e jetës në mbarim të kujdesem,
    Dhe të mbaj flakën prej shterrjes në pushim.
    Unë kisha shpresë, për krenarinë në shoqërim,
    Mes djaloshave të tregoj dijet time nga librat nxënë,
    Rreth zjarrit tim një mbrëmje grupin të tërheq,
    Dhe të tregoj gjithë si u ndjeva, dhe gjithë sa pashë;
    Dhe si një lepurushe që lukunia dhe boritë ndjekin
    I mbath tek vendi prej nga fillimit ajo fluturoi,
    Unë kisha shpresë, e shkuara ime e shqetsuar,
    Këtu të kthehem - dhe të vdes në shtëpi më në fund.
    O i bekuari lirim, mik i jetës në perëndim,
    Tërhequr prej kujdesit, që kurrë s'do jetë më imi!
    Sa i gëzuar ai që kurorëzon, në hije të tilla,
    Një rini me pune dhe një pleqëri të mbarë;
    .......................................

    ...me shpresën se 302 vargjeve të tjera do t'ju bekojë zoti ditë.
     
  7. renea

    renea Primus registratum

    Re: Përkthime

    bukur, mister ka mbetur diabolis dassaretis, megjithese kerkova, asgje nuk gjeta pervec nje lemshi mbi nje fis maqedonas
     
  8. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    E ke nisur kërkimin nga fundi. Mesa di je fetar, dhe mund të më ndihmoje duke rrëmuar (nëse ka mister akoma) për fjalën Diaballian (Diabolis), e përdorur në përkthimin e parë të Testamentit të Vjetër në Greqisht. Tek një Enciklopedi Katolike mund të gjesh shumë për fjalën dhe polemikat me shekuj për atë që ajo përfaqson.
    Jam thjesht një ball dhi e grigjës Shqiptare.
     
  9. Diavolessa

    Diavolessa Valoris scriptorum

  10. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    Catullus

    VII

    Mi chiedi con quanti baci, Lesbia,
    tu possa giungere a saziarmi:
    quanti sono i granelli di sabbia
    che a Cirene assediano i filari di silfio
    tra l'oracolo arroventato di Giove
    e l'urna sacra dell'antico Batto,
    o quante, nel silenzio della notte, le stelle
    che vegliano i nostri amori furtivi.
    Se tu mi baci con cos’ tanti baci
    che i curiosi non possano contarli
    o le malelingue gettarvi una malia,
    allora si placherá il delirio di Catullo.

    VII

    Quaeris, quot mihi basiationes
    tuae, Lesbia, sint satis superque.
    quam magnus numerus Libyssae harenae
    lasarpiciferis iacet Cyrenis
    oraclum Iovis inter aestuosi
    et Batti veteris sacrum sepulcrum;
    aut quam sidera multa, cum tacet nox,
    furtivos hominum vident amores:
    tam te basia multa basiare
    vesano satis et super Catullo est,
    quae nec pernumerare curiosi
    possint nec mala fascinare lingua.

    VII

    Më pyet, se me sa nga puthjet e tua,
    Lesbia, arrin të më kënaqësh mua.
    sa i madh është numri i rërave të Libisë
    që mbarten dhe mbështillen Sirenës
    prej orakllit të nxehtë të Jovit (Jupiterit)
    tek varri i shenjtë i Bato legjendarit;
    ose aq sa yjet e shumtë, që natën e qetë,
    tinëz vështrojnë dashuritë njerëzore:
    me aq shumë puthje në më puthon (puthën o)
    më mjaftojnë dhe e kënaqin Katullon,
    sa për kureshtarët mos kenë të numuruar
    ti helmojnë me gjuhët ligsht magjepsur.

    Për dy vargje s'jam i sigurt, po notoj në ujrat e qeta të shqipërimit. Pra mund ta ndryshoj sërish.
     
  11. Diavolessa

    Diavolessa Valoris scriptorum

    Re: Përkthime

    Më pyet, se me sa nga puthjet e tua,
    Lesbia, arrin të më kënaqësh mua.
    sa i madh është numri i rërave të Libisë
    që mbarten dhe mbështillen Sirenës
    prej orakllit të nxehtë të Jovit (Jupiterit)
    tek varri i shenjtë i Bato legjendarit;
    ose aq sa yjet e shumtë, që natën e qetë,
    tinëz vështrojnë dashuritë njerëzore:
    me aq shumë puthje në më puthon (puthën o)
    më mjaftojnë dhe e kënaqin Katullon,
    sa për kureshtarët mos kenë të numuruar
    ti helmojnë me gjuhët ligsht magjepsur.


    Perkthimi me pelqen por nuk e aprovoj te teren /pf/images/graemlins/smile.gif E ke mire, kurse une keta i kam ne liber /pf/images/graemlins/smile.gif Ndaj me duken ndryshe.

    Kete pjese qe ke zgjedhur e kisha dje si firme /pf/images/graemlins/smile.gif
    Perkthen bukur, por mund ta beje me mire.

    Ciao /pf/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  12. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    OCTAVIO PAZ

    Con los ojos cerrados

    Con los ojos cerrados
    Te iluminas por dentro
    Eres la piedra ciega

    Noche a noche te labro
    Con los ojos cerrados
    Eres la piedra franca

    Nos volvemos inmensos
    Solo por conocernos
    Con los ojos cerrados


    Me sytë e puthitur

    Me sytë e puthitur
    Ti brenda përndritur
    Je guri i sterruar

    Natë për natë latuar
    Me sytë e puthitur
    Je guri i çiltër

    Në viganë shndruar
    Vetëm për tu njohur
    Me sytë e puthitur
     
  13. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    FEDERICO GARCIA LORCA

    La Guitara

    Empieza el llanto
    de la guitarra.
    Se rompen las copas
    de la madrugada.
    Empieza el llanto
    de la guitarra.
    Es inutil
    callarla.
    Es imposible
    callarla.
    Llora monotona
    como llora el agua,
    como llora el viento
    sobre la nevada.
    Es imposible
    callarla.
    Llora por cosas
    lejanas.
    Arena del Sur caliente
    que pide camelias blancas.
    Llora flecha sin blanco,
    la tarde sin manjana,
    y el primer pajaro muerto
    sobre la rama.
    !Oh, guitarra!
    Corazon malherido
    por cinco espadas.

    Kitara

    Fillon të qarën
    kitara.
    Kupa e agimit
    mori të çara.
    Fillon të qarën
    kitara.
    Është e padobi
    e mosqara.
    Është e pamundur
    e mosqara.
    E qarë monotone
    si e qara në ujra,
    ashtu si qan era
    kur bie dëbora.
    Është e pamundur
    e mosqara.
    Qan për gjëra
    të largëta.
    Rëra përvëlonjëse e Jugut
    që lut kameliat e bardha.
    Qan shigjetën huq,
    mbrëmjen pa mëngjes,
    dhe të parin zog të vdekur
    përmbi degë.
    Oh, kitara!
    Zemër keqplagosur
    nga pesë shpata.
     
  14. mengjesi

    mengjesi Primus registratum

    Re: Përkthime

    Diabolis, te lutem E.E.Cummings. Kam shume besim tek ti.
     
  15. Diavolessa

    Diavolessa Valoris scriptorum

    Re: Përkthime

    Kurse une them ta nderrojme pak /pf/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Sikur te merrnim disa poesi ne shqip dhe ti perkthenim ne gjuhe te huaj do ishte me mire?
    Them se do ishte me e veshtire keshtu /pf/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Nje jave kohe shqip ne gjuhe te huaj , pastaj rrikthemi nga te huajat ne shqip /pf/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  16. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    Për E.E.Cummings do përkthej, por do gjej ndonjë që nuk shformohet në postim.
    Sa për të kundërtën nga shqipja në gjuhë të huaj, kam një problem të madh dhe tre të vegjël.
    Problemi i madh është se unë nuk e kam bërë zap anglishten ashtu si shqipen, dhe aq sa kam provuar kanë dalë njëlloj shpifo si përkthime të bërë më parë prej të tjerëve. Unë dua të kalëroj, jo të hipi majë kali.
    Problemet e vogla 1) nga interneti ka shumë pak nga ato që mund ti mbartim bukur prej shqipes në gjuhë tjetër; 2) unë nuk kam libra me poezi shqipe me vete (dua shumë); 3) jam i lodhur së dëgjuari jo kështu, jo ashtu, dalin mirë na vjedh të drejtat e autorit, dalin keq s'merr vesh.
    Gjithsesi nëse do ishte një përpjekje kolektive do bashkëpunoja.
     
  17. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    Paskësha postuar 365 herë në Albforum. Ky postim është si 29 Shkurti.

    E.E. CUMMINGS

    10

    maggie and milly and molly and may
    went down to the beach(to play one day)
    and maggie discovered a shell that sang
    so sweetly she couldn't remember her troubles,
    and milly befriended a stranded star
    whose rays five languid fingers were;
    and molly was chased by a horrible thing
    which raced sideways while blowing bubbles:and
    may came home with a smooth round stone
    as small as a world and as large as alone.
    For whatever we lose(like a you or a me)
    it's always ourselves we find in the sea


    megi dhe milli dhe molli dhe muji
    shkuan në plazh (një ditë të luanin)
    dhe megi zbuloi një guaskë që jehonte
    aq ëmël sa ajo telashet e saj mos kujtonte,
    dhe milli shoqëroi një yll të braktisur
    cepat e të cilit ishin pesë gishta të fishkur;
    dhe molli u ndoq nga një gjë e tmerrshme
    që vraponte në një anë ndërsa frynte flluska: dhe
    muji arriti në shtëpi me një gur rrumbullak të lëmuar
    aq të vogël sa një botë aq të gjërë sa ai i vetmuar.
    Për cilindo që humbëm (si një ju a një mua)
    ai është përherë vetja jonë që në det zbuluam
     
  18. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    E.E.CUMMINGS

    the Cambridge ladies who live in furnished souls
    are unbeautiful and have comfortable minds
    (also, with the church's protestant blessings
    daughters, unscented shapeless spirited)
    they believe in Christ and Longfellow,both dead,
    are invariably interested in so many things-
    at the present writing one still finds
    delighted fingers knitting for the is it Poles?
    perhaps. While permanent faces coyly bandy
    scandal of Mrs. N and Professor D
    ....the Cambridge ladies do not care,above
    Cambridge if sometimes in its box of
    sky lavender and cornerless, the
    moon rattles like a fragment of angry candy


    zonjat e Kembrixhit që jetojnë në shpirtra të orenditura
    janë të pabukura dhe janë mendjelehta
    (gjithashtu, me të bëkuarat nga kisha protestante
    vajza, paerë paformë shpirtëzuar)
    ato besojnë në Krishtin dhe Longfelloun, të dy vdekur,
    janë pandryshueshmërisht të interesuara në aq shumë gjëra-
    në shkrimin bashkëkohor njëra akoma gjen
    ushta të kënaqura të kalërojnë për ishin ata Polakët?
    mbase. Ndërsa fytyra të përhershme turpërisht përgojojnë
    skandalin e Zj. N dhe Profesorit D
    .... zonjat e Kembrixhit as bëhen merak, përmbi
    Kembrixh nëse ndonjëherë në kutinë e saj me
    klimë livandoje dhe të paskutë,
    hëna llomotit si një cifël sheqerkë zëmërake
     
  19. Diabolis Dassaretis

    Diabolis Dassaretis Forumium praecox

    Re: Përkthime

    e.e. cummings

    when god lets my body be

    From each brave eye shall sprout a tree
    fruit dangles therefrom

    the purpled world will dance upon
    Between my lips which did sing

    a rose shall beget the spring
    that maidens whom passions wastes

    will lay between their little breasts
    My strong fingers beneath the snow

    Into strenous birds shall go
    my love walking in the grass

    their wings will touch with their face
    and all the while shall my heart be

    With the bulge and nuzzle of the sea


    kur zoti të më lejojë të jem kurmi im

    Nga çdo sy guximtar do të lastaret një pemë
    fruta varur prej andej

    bota e purpurtë do vallëzojë përtej
    Midis buzëve të mia kënduar

    një trëndafil pranverën do ketë ftuar
    që vashëzat të cilat dëshirat harxhojnë

    do prehin midis gjokseve të tyre imcakë
    Gishtat e mi të ashpër nën borë

    Në zogj të kapitur do të kalojë
    dashuria ime duke ecur në halijerat

    flatrat e tyre do tju prekë me faqkat
    dhe menjëherë do jetë shpirti im

    Me të detit zgurdullim dhe rrëmim


    grass - bar, kullotë, grass widow - grua që nuk e ka burrin pranë

    halijera - kullota pa zot
     
  20. alinos

    alinos Forumium maestatis

    Re: Përkthime

    Se pse mu kujtua Kruja :rolleyes:
     

Shpërndajeni këtë faqe